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Library hours:
Monday-Thursday 10-7
Friday 10-6
Saturday 10-5
Sunday 1-5

PT Library Events Calendar

Join us for upcoming events, classes and programs at the Port Townsend Public Library! All events are free and open to the public.
 Limit by audience:
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Art in Action - Fly-
Friday, Aug. 17, 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Join master fly-tier, guide and local fisherman, Bob Triggs for a fly-tying demonstration in the Library.


Bob Triggs began his outdoors life on the small ponds and streams of the sprawling Adirondack Mountain Wilderness Park in upstate New York. He is a lifelong fisherman, boater and outdoorsman with a broad range of wilderness experience and skills. He studied literature and biology at Rutgers University and at Purchase College, and worked for many years in the restoration and conservation of antiquities, and as a writer. In 1980 he took up the grand obsession of fly fishing on the storied waters of the Catskill Mountains of New York; birthplace of American fly fishing. He has fished extensively throughout the Atlantic states for numerous species in both fresh and salt waters. Bob began his guiding career in 1994 and since then has guided in New England, New York, Alaska, Kamchatka-Russia and Washington's Olympic Peninsula. His articles and essays on the fishing life have appeared in Fly Fisherman Magazine, Fly Fishing in Salt Waters, Heading Out, The Yale Angler's Journal, Land Rover Journal and numerous regional outdoors publications and newspapers. He writes and fishes on Washington's Olympic Peninsula.https://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/guides/littlestone/

  Sponsored by Friends of the Port Townsend Library.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Jonathan White - Tid
Thursday, Oct. 4, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Jonathan’s love for the sea is lifelong. He grew up on the beaches of southern California. He’s built and sailed many boats, logged more than a hundred thousand miles on the Pacific and Atlantic, and surfed all over the world. He has served on numerous conservation boards and committees, including the San Juan Preservation Trust, the San Juan County Marine Resources Committee, and the Northwest Straits Marine Conservation Initiative.

As founder and former director of the Resource Institute, a nonprofit educational organization based in Seattle, Washington, he spent eleven years building a seminar program aboard the schooner Crusader in the Pacific Northwest, from Puget Sound to Southeast Alaska. Resource Institute sponsored weeklong seminars aboard the sixty-five-foot schooner, with subjects ranging from navigation, anthropology, and whale research to poetry, writing, music, and photography. Psychologist James Hillman taught a seminar on the role of animals in dreams; scientist Lynn Margulis discussed the Gaia Hypothesis; poet Gary Snyder pondered the role of killer whales and bears in Haida mythology. Robert Bly, Gretel Ehrlich, Richard Nelson, Paul Winter, Art Wolfe, and William Stafford were among the many others who taught aboard Crusader.  Jonathan’s first book, Talking on the Water, grew out of these experiences.

While on a seminar in Southeast Alaska, Crusader ran aground on a spring tide. After nearly losing the boat, Jonathan vowed to learn more about this mysterious and implacable force. Ten years of research took him to five continents where he saw the largest, fastest, scariest and most amazing tides in the world. With Lukasi Nappaaluk, an Inuit elder, he slithered through a hole in the arctic ice and gathered mussels in the dark cavities left behind by a dropping tide. In China, he witnessed the world’s largest tidal bore, a 25-foot wave that charges upriver at twenty miles an hour. And at the Royal Society of London, he learned that Plato and Aristotle, Leonardo de Vinci, Newton, Descartes, and many other noted thinkers had been captivated – and befuddled — by the tide’s mystery. The book that led to Galileo’s arrest for heresy by the Catholic Church, in fact, was a treatise originally called “The Flux and Reflux of the Tides.” It’s been that important to mankind for centuries. But the story has never been properly told.

Sponsored by Friends of the Port Townsend Library.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Create Your Own  Aut
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Thursday, Oct. 11, 6:00pm-8:00pm

Typically stories of the self (autobiographies) are told through a narrative of a passage through time. In this workshop, we will learn how to create a story of ourselves through a series of meaningful places instead. Whether it’s a home, a riverbank, a car, a corner in a city or a meadow high up in the mountains, we will take our most significant places and use them to compose our own autogeographies.

 

Our autogeographies can be created through any mode of expression. They can be essays, poems, songs, films, or paintings. All that we want to do is dig deep into our personal relationships with places and translate them into any medium. There will be no grades and no prizes. But there will be expression, creativity, and fun.

 

Dr. Rob Sullivan will be leading the workshop. He has a PhD in geography from UCLA and has taught geography at UCLA, Cal State University Northridge, Cal State University Los Angeles, and Santa Monica College.

Sponsored by Dr. Rob Sullivan.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Create Your Own  Aut
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Thursday, Oct. 18, 6:00pm-8:00pm

Typically stories of the self (autobiographies) are told through a narrative of a passage through time. In this workshop, we will learn how to create a story of ourselves through a series of meaningful places instead. Whether it’s a home, a riverbank, a car, a corner in a city or a meadow high up in the mountains, we will take our most significant places and use them to compose our own autogeographies.

 

Our autogeographies can be created through any mode of expression. They can be essays, poems, songs, films, or paintings. All that we want to do is dig deep into our personal relationships with places and translate them into any medium. There will be no grades and no prizes. But there will be expression, creativity, and fun.

 

Dr. Rob Sullivan will be leading the workshop. He has a PhD in geography from UCLA and has taught geography at UCLA, Cal State University Northridge, Cal State University Los Angeles, and Santa Monica College.

Sponsored by Dr. Rob Sullivan.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Create Your Own  Aut
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6:00pm-8:00pm

Typically stories of the self (autobiographies) are told through a narrative of a passage through time. In this workshop, we will learn how to create a story of ourselves through a series of meaningful places instead. Whether it’s a home, a riverbank, a car, a corner in a city or a meadow high up in the mountains, we will take our most significant places and use them to compose our own autogeographies.

 

Our autogeographies can be created through any mode of expression. They can be essays, poems, songs, films, or paintings. All that we want to do is dig deep into our personal relationships with places and translate them into any medium. There will be no grades and no prizes. But there will be expression, creativity, and fun.

 

Dr. Rob Sullivan will be leading the workshop. He has a PhD in geography from UCLA and has taught geography at UCLA, Cal State University Northridge, Cal State University Los Angeles, and Santa Monica College.

Sponsored by Dr. Rob Sullivan.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Create Your Own  Aut
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Thursday, Nov. 1, 6:00pm-8:00pm

Typically stories of the self (autobiographies) are told through a narrative of a passage through time. In this workshop, we will learn how to create a story of ourselves through a series of meaningful places instead. Whether it’s a home, a riverbank, a car, a corner in a city or a meadow high up in the mountains, we will take our most significant places and use them to compose our own autogeographies.

 

Our autogeographies can be created through any mode of expression. They can be essays, poems, songs, films, or paintings. All that we want to do is dig deep into our personal relationships with places and translate them into any medium. There will be no grades and no prizes. But there will be expression, creativity, and fun.

 

Dr. Rob Sullivan will be leading the workshop. He has a PhD in geography from UCLA and has taught geography at UCLA, Cal State University Northridge, Cal State University Los Angeles, and Santa Monica College.

Sponsored by Dr. Rob Sullivan.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Create Your Own  Aut
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Thursday, Nov. 8, 6:00pm-8:00pm

Typically stories of the self (autobiographies) are told through a narrative of a passage through time. In this workshop, we will learn how to create a story of ourselves through a series of meaningful places instead. Whether it’s a home, a riverbank, a car, a corner in a city or a meadow high up in the mountains, we will take our most significant places and use them to compose our own autogeographies.

 

Our autogeographies can be created through any mode of expression. They can be essays, poems, songs, films, or paintings. All that we want to do is dig deep into our personal relationships with places and translate them into any medium. There will be no grades and no prizes. But there will be expression, creativity, and fun.

 

Dr. Rob Sullivan will be leading the workshop. He has a PhD in geography from UCLA and has taught geography at UCLA, Cal State University Northridge, Cal State University Los Angeles, and Santa Monica College.

Sponsored by Dr. Rob Sullivan.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Orca - How We Came t
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Jason M. Colby will join us to talk about his new book, Orca - How We Came to Know and Love the Ocean's Greatest Predator. Jason is the Associate Professor and Undergraduate Adviser in History with the University of Victoria. He holds a BA and an MA from Whitman College and a PhD from Cornell. His areas of interest are in international relations and environmental history. This is his second book. 

Since the release of the documentary Blackfish in 2013, millions around the world have focused on the plight of the orca, the most profitable and controversial display animal in history. Yet, until now, no historical account has explained how we came to care about killer whales in the first place. 

Drawing on interviews, official records, private archives, and his own family history, Jason M. Colby tells the exhilarating and often heartbreaking story of how people came to love the ocean's greatest predator. Historically reviled as dangerous pests, killer whales were dying by the hundreds, even thousands, by the 1950s--the victims of whalers, fishermen, and even the US military. In the Pacific Northwest, fishermen shot them, scientists harpooned them, and the Canadian government mounted a machine gun to eliminate them. But that all changed in 1965, when Seattle entrepreneur Ted Griffin became the first person to swim and perform with a captive killer whale. The show proved wildly popular, and he began capturing and selling others, including Sea World's first Shamu.

Over the following decade, live display transformed views of Orcinus orca. The public embraced killer whales as charismatic and friendly, while scientists enjoyed their first access to live orcas. In the Pacific Northwest, these captive encounters reshaped regional values and helped drive environmental activism, including Greenpeace's anti-whaling campaigns. Yet even as Northwesterners taught the world to love whales, they came to oppose their captivity and to fight for the freedom of a marine predator that had become a regional icon. 

This is the definitive history of how the feared and despised "killer" became the beloved "orca"--and what that has meant for our relationship with the ocean and its creatures.
  Sponsored by Friends of the Port Townsend Library.
F E A T U R E D   E V E N T
Create Your Own  Aut
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Thursday, Nov. 15, 6:00pm-8:00pm

Typically stories of the self (autobiographies) are told through a narrative of a passage through time. In this workshop, we will learn how to create a story of ourselves through a series of meaningful places instead. Whether it’s a home, a riverbank, a car, a corner in a city or a meadow high up in the mountains, we will take our most significant places and use them to compose our own autogeographies.

 

Our autogeographies can be created through any mode of expression. They can be essays, poems, songs, films, or paintings. All that we want to do is dig deep into our personal relationships with places and translate them into any medium. There will be no grades and no prizes. But there will be expression, creativity, and fun.

 

Dr. Rob Sullivan will be leading the workshop. He has a PhD in geography from UCLA and has taught geography at UCLA, Cal State University Northridge, Cal State University Los Angeles, and Santa Monica College.

Sponsored by Dr. Rob Sullivan.
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Monday, Jul. 16, 3:30pm-5:30pm
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Monday, Jul. 16, 5:30pm-6:45pm (Third Mondays of the Month)
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Monday, Jul. 16, 7 pm- 9pm (3rd Monday of the month 7:00 pm)
Closed meeting
Tuesday, Jul. 17, 10:15-10:45
Preschool storytime brings early literacy to kids and their caregivers with songs, rhymes, and activities. The emphasis for this age group is on kindergarten readiness and fostering a love of reading.
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Tuesday, Jul. 17, 10:15am-11:45pm
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Tuesday, Jul. 17, 2-3:30pm
Start your story with a bang! A writing workshop with published Children's book author, Patrick Jennings. Ages 12-18
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Tuesday, Jul. 17, 6:30pm-8:30pm (1st and 3rd Tuesdays of the month)
Come and enjoy an evening of working on handiwork projects with other fiber artists (from knitting to quilting to weaving all fiber arts projects are welcomed). Please bring your own supplies.
Wednesday, Jul. 18, 10:15-10:45
Newborns up to 18 months and their caregivers enjoy rhymes, fingerplays, songs, shakers, bubbles, and other activities for the very young. This program supports language development, provides age-appropriate stimulation, and offers caregivers an opportunity to build community.
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Wednesday, Jul. 18, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Learn the basics of coding in this 6 week course. Open to ages 10-14 years. 
Charles Pink House - 1256 Lawrence St.
Wednesday, Jul. 18, 4:00-6:45
Thursday, Jul. 19, 10:15-10:45
18-36 month olds and their caregivers enjoy songs, short stories, fingerplays, felt boards, and hands-on activities while they explore language and build their early literacy skills.