Library Events

Poetry Night
Thursday, Aug. 25, 7:00
Join us at the library to share some of your favorite poetry, or listen to others share theirs!
Farmer’s Marke
Friday, Aug. 26, 4:00
Join us at the Farmer's Market on the Newport Town Common for story time!
60th Library Festiva
Saturday, Aug. 27, 9:00 - 3:00
Toddler Story Time
Wednesday, Aug. 31, 10:30
A lapsit story time for babies and toddlers from birth through age two. We sing songs, rhymes and read a couple books.
Preschool Story Time
Wednesday, Aug. 31, 11:00 (Wednesdays)
A preschool story time for chilren ages two through six.  We read books, sing songs and do a simple craft.
Farmer’s Marke
Friday, Sep. 2, 4:00
Join us at the Farmer's Market on the Newport Town Common for story time!
Toddler Story Time
Wednesday, Sep. 7, 10:30
A lapsit story time for babies and toddlers from birth through age two. We sing songs, rhymes and read a couple books.
Preschool Story Time
Wednesday, Sep. 7, 11:00 (Wednesdays)
A preschool story time for chilren ages two through six.  We read books, sing songs and do a simple craft.
Preston Heller - The
Thursday, Sep. 8, 7:00
Join us at the Arts Center to meet Perston Heller, The Mentalist!   

A mentalist reads minds, projects thoughts to others, divines information held secret, predicts results, and much more.
 
Preston Heller's 2016 show, “Well Guarded Secrets”, involves a good deal of audience participation.  Why?  Because mentalism works best, and is most entertaining, when there is a spirit of cooperation between the mentalist and those in attendance. The result is always a surprising experience for the attendees and is great fun for all present. And while the show is spiced with a lot of sophisticated humor, it is 100% family friendly (recommended for ages 12 and up).
  
Enhanced psychic abilities, predictions, thought implantation, telekinesis, sixth sense, telepathy and even the occasional inexplicable physical illusion – this is what is on display.  If you attend you will see all of this and more, up close and personal, but when you come, please remember – not even your most “Well Guarded Secrets” are safe.  Are you up to the challenge?


 
Knitting
Tuesday, Sep. 20, 6:00-8:00
Bring in your knitting and join us for some conversation.
Wednesday Night Book
Wednesday, Sep. 21, 7:00
We will be discussing and comparing the books The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and The Double Bind by Chris Bohjalian.  Copies of the books are available for loan from the library.

The Great Gatsby:  In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write "something new--something extraordinary and beautiful and simple + intricately patterned." That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald's finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald's--and his country's--most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. "Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter--tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther.... And one fine morning--" Gatsby's rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

The Double Bind: Readers will be startled to learn early on that the heroine of this engrossing puzzle, 26-year-old Laurel Estabrook, was born in West Egg. Wait a minute, wasn't West Egg where Jay Gatsby lived? Laurel works in a Burlington, Vt., homeless shelter and is trying to overcome mental and physical scars incurred from a brutal assault some six years earlier. After being given a portfolio of photographs taken by a recently deceased resident of the shelter, Bobbie Crocker, she becomes obsessed with questions surrounding what appears to be a picture of herself shot on the day of her attack. Laurel's already fragile mental state begins to unravel as she follows Bobbie's life from his rich-kid childhood on Long Island to homelessness in Vermont. The Gatsby references form the basis of the mystery, compelling readers to try to imagine how this fictional backdrop relates to the novel's "reality." It's a high-wire act for bestseller Bohjalian (Midwives), and while the climactic explanation may be a letdown for some, he generally pulls off a tricky and intriguing premise.

Books on Tap
Tuesday, Sep. 27, 6:30
This month we will be discussing the book Season of Ice by Diane Les Becquets.  Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.

The wild winter setting of northern Maine is the exciting backdrop for this story of Genesis, 17, who is encouraged by her beloved dad to become a champion ice-car racer. Then Dad disappears in a storm; his boat is empty, and until the ice melts in the spring, there’s no way to find his body. That means the family can’t collect his life insurance, so Gen drops out of school to wait tables and help her distant stepmom and her stepbrothers. Along with her raging sorrow, Gen must deal with a disturbing small-town rumor: Dad has run off somewhere with another woman. Les Becquets’ exploration of the stages of grief goes on too long; there’s too much detail about anger and denial before Gen finds a comforting romance. But some of the action is thrilling, especially when Gen speeds through the ice and fog in a snowmobile and drives a truck up lonely dangerous hills, searching for closure and for a sense of her own true self. 
Knitting
Tuesday, Oct. 18, 6:00-8:00
Bring in your knitting and join us for some conversation.
Wednesday Night Book
Wednesday, Oct. 19, 7:00
We will be discussing the book Breaking Wild with its author, Diane Les Becquets.  Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.  

It is the last weekend of the season for Amy Raye Latour to get away. Driven to spend days alone in the wilderness, Amy Raye, mother of two, is compelled by the quiet and the rush of nature. But this time, her venture into a remote area presents a different set of dangers than Amy Raye has planned for and she finds herself on the verge of the precarious edge that she’s flirted with her entire life.
 
When Amy Raye doesn’t return to camp, ranger Pru Hathaway and her dog respond to the missing person’s call. After an unexpected snowfall and few leads, the operation turns into a search and recovery. Pru, though, is not resigned to that. The more she learns about the woman for whom she is searching, and about Amy Raye’s past, the more she suspects that Amy Raye might yet be alive. Pru’s own search becomes an obsession for a woman whose life is just as mysterious as the clues she has left behind.
 
As the novel follows Amy Raye and Pru in alternating threads,Breaking Wild assumes the white-knuckled pace of a thriller laying bare Amy Raye’s ultimate reckoning with the secrets of her life, and Pru’s dogged pursuit of the woman who, against all odds, she believes she can find.

Bio of Diane Les Becquets:  
Before the debut of Diane Les Becquets's adult novel BREAKING WILD (Berkley, Penguin Random House), she was hailed by Publishers Weekly as a "writer to watch" after the release of her young adult novelTHE STONES OF MOURNING CREEK(YA Kirkus Star Review). Since then she has published two other young adult novels: LOVE, CAJUN STYLE (YA Booklist Star Review) and SEASON OF ICE, the latter being the recipient of a Pen American Fellowship. Other awards she has received include aBCCB Blue Ribbon Award, the Maine Lupine Award, ALA Best Book of the Year, Foreward Reviews Gold Winner Book of the Year, Volunteer State Book Award Selection, and Garden State Book Award Finalist. Her nonfiction essays have been published in Idaho Review, Amoskeag, and several anthologies.

Les Becquets is a Professor of English and a faculty member of the
Master of Fine Arts Program in Fiction and Nonfiction at Southern New Hampshire University, where she was the program director for over three years. She has served as a judge for the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts and the Maine Arts Commission, and has taught writing workshops at venues across the country, including the University of Mississippi, Auburn University, theNew Hampshire Writers' Project, the Department of Forestry, Writers Conference at Ocean Park, Writers in Paradise, the Arkansas Writers Festival, the Telluride Arts District, and at shelters for Katrina victims.  A native of Nashville, Tennessee, Les Becquets received her B.A. in English from Auburn University and her M.F.A. from the University of Southern Maine. In addition to teaching creative writing, she has worked as a medical journalist, an archaeology assistant in the fields of Colorado, a marketing writer, a sand and gravel dispatcher, a lifeguard, a motivational speaker, and a music teacher. She is an avid outdoors woman, enjoying archery, bicycling, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, backpacking, and hiking in the woods with her Labrador, Lacey. Before moving to New Hampshire she lived in a small ranching town in Northwestern Colorado for almost fourteen years, raising her three sons. 




 
Knitting
Tuesday, Nov. 15, 6:00-8:00
Bring in your knitting and join us for some conversation.
Wednesday Night Book
Wednesday, Nov. 16, 7:00
We will be discussing the book Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline.  Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.

A long journey from home and the struggle to find it again form the heart of the intertwined stories that make up this moving novel. Foster teen Molly is performing community-service work for elderly widow Vivian, and as they go through Vivian’s cluttered attic, they discover that their lives have much in common. When Vivian was a girl, she was taken to a new life on an orphan train. These trains carried children to adoptive families for 75 years, from the mid-nineteenth century to the start of the Great Depression. Novelist Kline (Bird in Hand, 2009) brings Vivian’s hardscrabble existence in ­Depression-era Minnesota to stunning life. Molly’s present-day story in Maine seems to pale in comparison, but as we listen to the two characters talk, we find grace and power in both of these seemingly disparate lives. Although the girls are vulnerable, left to the whims of strangers, they show courage and resourcefulness. Kline illuminates a largely hidden chapter of American history, while portraying the coming-of-age of two resilient young women.
Wednesday Night Book
Wednesday, Dec. 21, 6:00
Read a book of your choice this month and bring it in to tell us about it!  Also bring in a dish to share for our pot luck dinner.
Wednesday Night Book
Wednesday, Jan. 18, 7:00
We will be discussing the book Talking to the Dead by Harry Bingham.  Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.

When a prostitute and a young girl are found murdered in a run-down South Wales apartment building, police immediately place the blame on drugs. But when a dead millionaire’s credit card is found at the crime scene, Welsh Detective Constable Fiona Griffiths suspects something even more sinister afoot. Faced with cracking her first big case, the Cambridge-educated rookie cop must take care not to ruffle feathers as she pursues leads. Everyone on the squad knows she suffered a psychological breakdown years before joining the force, and her supervisors err on the side of caution when assigning her tasks. DC Griffiths may be battling demons, but she’s not going to let them win, proving herself more than worthy as she closes in on possible culprits, including a corrupt former cop who’s equal parts trouble and charm. She also finds a romantic diversion with a handsome blond colleague. In his American debut, British novelist Bingham renders a sympathetic heroine and a crackerjack mystery. Happily for readers, he’s already working on the next series installment.
Wednesday Night Book
Wednesday, Feb. 15, 7:00
We will be discussing the book Clover Adams by Natalie Dykstra.  Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.

Clover Adams, a fiercely intelligent Boston Brahmin, married at twenty-eight the soon-to-be-eminent American historian Henry Adams. She thrived in her role as an intimate of power brokers in Gilded Age Washington, where she was admired for her wit and taste by such luminaries as Henry James, H. H. Richardson, and General William Tecumseh Sherman. Clover so clearly possessed, as one friend wrote, “all she wanted, all this world could give.” 

Yet at the center of her story is a haunting mystery. Why did Clover, having begun in the spring of 1883 to capture her world vividly through photography, end her life less than three years later by drinking a chemical developer she used in the darkroom? The key to the mystery lies, as Natalie Dykstra’s searching account makes clear, in Clover’s photographs themselves. 

The aftermath of Clover’s death is equally compelling. Dykstra probes Clover’s enduring reputation as a woman betrayed. And, most movingly, she untangles the complex, poignant — and universal — truths of her shining and impossible marriage.
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