Richards Free Library Library Events
 
Bingo for Books!
Monday, Dec. 22, 3:15 (Mondays)
Join us to play a few games of Bingo and win free books!
Library Closed for C
Wednesday, Dec. 24,
We will be closed on December 24 and 25 in honor of the Christmas holidays.  See you on Friday!
Library Closed for C
Thursday, Dec. 25,
We will be closed on December 24 and 25 in honor of the Christmas holidays.  See you on Friday!
Bingo for Books!
Monday, Dec. 29, 3:15 (Mondays)
Join us to play a few games of Bingo and win free books!
Library Closing Earl
Wednesday, Dec. 31,
The library will be closing today at 3:00 in celebration of New Year's Eve.
Library Closed for N
Thursday, Jan. 1,
The library will be closed January 1 in celebration of New Year's Day.  Happy New Year!
Saturday Knitting
Saturday, Jan. 3, 10:00 (1st and 3rd Saturday)
Bring in your knitting project and join our new Saturday group! We'll be meeting the first and third Saturday of each month.  All levels welcome.
Bingo for Books!
Monday, Jan. 5, 3:15 (Mondays)
Join us to play a few games of Bingo and win free books!
Brown Bag and Books
Tuesday, Jan. 6, 12:00
We will be discussing the book Murder as a Fine Art by David Morrell.  Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.

At the start of this exceptional historical mystery, an artist of death prepares himself for his greatest creation—the gruesome slaughter of a young shop owner and his family. In 1854, East Londoners hadn’t seen such horrific murders since 1851, when John Williams also killed a shopkeeper and his family in a nearby neighborhood. The new crime finds Detective Inspector Shawn Ryan at the grisly, chaotic crime scene, where evidence is trampled as the killer blithely escapes. Visiting London at the time, for reasons he can’t fully understand, is Thomas De Quincey, scandalous “opium eater” and author of the 1827 satirical essay, “On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts,” and two newer essays in which he lauds various horrific details of the Williams killings as sublime art. DI Ryan initially treats the drug-riddled, elderly writer as a suspect but eventually accepts his help, if grudgingly. Military-thriller writer Morrell switches genres here in a riveting novel packed with edifying historical minutiae seamlessly inserted into a story narrated in part by De Quincey’s daughter and partly in revealing, dialogue-rich prose. The page-flipping action, taut atmosphere, and multifaceted characters will remind readers of D. E. Meredith’s Hatton and Roumonde mysteries and Kenneth Cameron’s The Frightened Man (2009). Sure to be a hit with the gaslight crowd.
Youth Writer’s
Wednesday, Jan. 7, 3:15-5:00 (December 3 and 17)
If you're interested in creative writing, join us to talk about our writing, some writing workshops, and a lot of fun! Bring your stories to share if you want.
Bingo for Books!
Monday, Jan. 12, 3:15 (Mondays)
Join us to play a few games of Bingo and win free books!
Saturday Knitting
Saturday, Jan. 17, 10:00 (1st and 3rd Saturday)
Bring in your knitting project and join our new Saturday group! We'll be meeting the first and third Saturday of each month.  All levels welcome.
Wednesday Night Book
Wednesday, Jan. 21, 7:00
We will be discussing the book Desert Queen by Janet Wallach.  Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.

A biography of the woman who, indirectly, was the catalyst for many of the troubles in the Middle East, including the Gulf War. In 1918, Gertrude Bell drew the region's proposed boundaries on a piece of tracing paper. Her qualifications for doing so were her extensive travel, her fluency in both Persian and Arabic, and her relationships with sheiks and tribal and religious leaders. She also possessed an ability to understand the subtle and indirect politeness of the culture, something many of her colonialist comrades were oblivious to. As a self-made statesman her sex was an asset, enabling her to bypass the ladder of protocol and dive into the business of building an Empire.
Poetry Night
Thursday, Jan. 22, 7:00
Join us at the library and share some of your favorite poems.
Books on Tap
Tuesday, Jan. 27, 6:30
This month we will be discussing the book The Beginner's Goodbye by Ann Tyler. Copies of the book are available for loan from the library.

"The strangest thing about my wife’s return from the dead was how other people reacted." So begins Anne Tyler's new novel, which documents the days of Aaron Woolcott after the unexpected loss of his wife, Dorothy. And as arresting as the first sentence is, it's also a bit worrying. So many clichés could follow. Will Aaron resolve his grief through poetic moonlit walks with the apparition of his lost wife? Thankfully, this is Anne Tyler. And the ghost of Dorothy, like all Tyler's characters, has a kind of rich, eccentric depth that sits opposite to the expected. Aaron's recovery after his wife's death conveys all the subtle hallmarks of Tyler's style, where a flawed man must learn how to do a very difficult thing--say a final goodbye.
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58 N. Main St., Newport, NH ~(603)863-3430~fax: (603) 863-3022 ~rfl@newport.lib.nh.us