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Keeping you up-to-date on what's happening at your library. We invite you to join in the conversation!
MARCH 22, 2010
March is National Nutrition Month
National Nutrition Month is upon us – why not make it a family decision by taking the 'Just One More for Healthy Living' pledge at www.eatjustonemore.com. The campaign is dedicated to encouraging families to incorporate an additional serving of fruits and veggies daily and lean protein weekly.  They are manageable steps that produce big results. 

There are lots of small steps you can take to ensure you and your family is eating healthy amounts of the right foods.  (brought to you by foodreference.com)

Be Creative. Try something different, like washing and clipping grapes into small bunches and putting them in the freezer.  Try with bananas too!

Cut Down on Fat. Try low-fat dairy products, poultry without skin and lean meats to get flavor without a lot of calories.

Serve healthy snacks and have smaller meals.  Stock your kitchen with healthy lunch and snack foods, such as raisins, popcorn, sliced vegetables and fruit.
Don't use food as punishment or reward.

Keep Track.  Let your kids "eat the rainbow."  Keep a chart on the fridge so your kids can record each color fruit or vegetable they have each day.  You can also have then plan, shop for and prepare meals – they are likely to make better choices when they are involved in the process. 

Get Moving.  Encourage informal play virtually everyday.  If you can't participate with your kids during the week, plan on being active during the weekend.  Go skating, walk your dog, clean the house…

Turn off the TV. Never eat in front of the TV and encourage your children to do something active instead of watching TV. 
 

Here are some delicious recipes to get you started and guaranteed your whole family will love!
FOR BREAKFAST TRY:
Sunrise Sunday
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Servings: 3

Ingredients

• 1-1/2 cups low-fat granola or other dry cereal
• 1 cup low-fat plain or vanilla yogurt
• 1 can (15.25 oz.) Del Monte Lite Fruit Cocktail, drained
Directions
In tall glasses, spoon alternating layers of granola or any other dry cereal, yogurt and fruit cocktail.
For easy variety use any 6 pack of single serving assorted dry cereals and Fruits.

FOR LUNCH TRY:
Corn and Chicken Tostada
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 0 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients

• 4 tostada shells or tortilla chips
• 6 or 1-1/4 oz or cups chicken strips, cooked
• 2/3 cup salsa or taco sauce
• 1 or 11 can or oz Del Monte Golden Sweet Corn, drained
• Lettuce, Shredded
• Cheddar Cheese, Shredded
Directions:
Warm tostada shells according to package directions.  Meanwhile, combine chicken, salsa and corn in medium saucepan.  Heat through.  Layer lettuce, cheese and corn mixture on tostada shells or over tortilla chips.  Serve with sour cream, if desired.

FOR DINNER TRY:
Beef Macaroni and Cheese
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cooking Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients

• 1 lb. ground beef
• 1 cup chopped onion
• 1 can (14 ½ oz) Del Monte Diced Tomatoes with Basil, Garlic & Oregano
• 1 cup elbow macaroni
• 1-1/2 cups shredded Cheddar Cheese
Directions
Brown meat and onion over medium-high heat in skillet; drain.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired.
Add tomatoes and 1 cup water; bring to boil.
Stir in macaroni.  Cover and simmer 10 minutes or until cooked.
Stir in cheese.  Garnish with sour cream, if desired.

FOR DESERT TRY:
Caramelized Pineapple with Ice Cream
Prep Time: 3 minutes
Cooking Time: 7 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients
• 1 can (15-1/2 oz.) Del Monte® Pineapple Chunks in Syrup
• 2 Tbsp. firmly packed brown sugar
• 1 Tbsp. melted butter
Directions
Spread pineapple with 2 tablespoons syrup in 2-quart baking dish.  Top with sugar and drizzle with butter.  Bake at 450°F 7 minutes or until lightly browned.  Spoon hot pineapple over ice cream.  Serve immediately.

Our library has many resources available on nutrition, diet, and exercise for males, females and kids.  We have workout videos, cookbooks, and many books on diet and nutrition for all ages.   If you’re interested in something that we don’t have in our collection we can also borrow for you through Interlibrary Loan.  Just let us know what you need, we’re here to help you get the information and resources that you need.  Until next time, Happy Reading!

Add a comment  (0 comments) posted by Tina Marie

Categories: FYILibrary Info

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MARCH 8, 2010
Women's History Month
     The public celebration of women's history in this country began in 1978 as "Women's History Week" in Sonoma County, California. The week including March 8, International Women's Day, was selected. In 1981, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Rep. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) co-sponsored a joint Congressional resolution proclaiming a national Women's History Week. In 1987, Congress expanded the celebration to a month, and March was declared Women's History Month.

Get to know the wonderful women who’ve changed our world:
     She was the first child of English colonists to be born in America.It's not known how old Virginia Dare (1587- unknown) lived to be after her birth in America. She and over 90 other colonists of Roanoke's "Lost Colony" mysteriously disappeared from their settlement and were never heard from again.
     A mysterious fever left Helen Keller (1880-1968) blind, deaf, and unable to speak before her second birthday. After overcoming many challenges throughout her life, she attended Radcliffe College and is recognized for becoming the first deaf-blind person to earn a college degree.
     Sold as a child slave to the Wheatley family of Boston, Phyllis Wheatley (1753?-1784) grew up to become the first African American to ever be published.
     Sybil Ludington (1761-1839) became a young heroine of the American Revolutionary War when she bravely rode horseback during the night to warn that the British were attacking Connecticut.
     Betsy Ross (1752-1836) is said to have helped design and sew the first official flag of the United States of America.
     There are many many more… If this has peeked your interest in learning about the many women that have made history, why not check out the many wonderful books that we have available at the library?  Or search online for the particular women that you’re interested in learning about (just Google their name).  Or if your curious about different women, try this link to Gale Cengage Learning http://www.gale.cengage.com/free_resources/whm/and for the younger audience check out Time for Kids at http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/whm.  Why not get the kids or grandkids excited about the men or women that have made history?  Quiz them on the ones that they have already learned about and see how much they still remember.  Take a trip to the library to get them interested in learning about new people, people that did great things.  We would be more than happy to help you get the books or materials that you need.  Stop by anytime, give us a call (641)482-3115 or send us an email at tina-marie@melbourne.lib.ia.us.   Until next time, Happy Reading!

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Category: FYI

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JANUARY 25, 2010
Celebrate National Eye Care Month(from www.lasik-pages.com)

January is National Eye Care Month. So celebrate! This month has been dedicated by eye care professionals nationwide to the promotion of healthy vision. Optometrists and ophthalmologists suggest strongly that you get your eyes checked every year, and what better time to do so than in January when we are celebrating all things new? It doesn’t matter whether or not you wear corrective lenses, or even if you think your eyes are in perfect condition. Getting regular eye exams is an important part of your overall health care, and vital to ensure your continued healthy vision.

 
Promoting Healthy Vision Across America
 
In order to promote healthy vision across the country, optometrists and ophthalmologists have declared that January should be National Eye Care Month. With virtually every other month being dedicated to one cause or another, why not a month dedicated to the preservation of healthy vision, as well? So, what can you do to help us celebrate this national month of eye health?
 
Schedule Eye Exams For Your Entire Family
 
It is vital that your entire family undergo an eye exam each year, if you want their vision to remain intact. National Eye Care Month is the perfect time to schedule these appointments. For the sake of you and your children, make proper eye care one of your new year’s resolutions, and you will be giving your family the ultimate gift – the gift of sight.
 
Donate Your Old Eyewear
 
Another way you can help us to celebrate National Eye Care Month, is to donate your old eye glasses to a local charity; or, you can take them to your optometrist to be given to someone who needs them. Many charities across the globe take donations of used eye glasses, to be given to those who are financially unable to purchase their own. Many optometrists also donate their time in mobile eye clinics to provide eye care to the indigent. These people who have no home are in need of your help to ensure that their vision does not fail. Donating your used eye glasses to a charity or to your optometrist could just help a homeless person to see well enough to obtain employment and become self reliant.
 
Regardless of how you choose to celebrate National Eye Care Month, the fact remains that your eye health, and the health of your family’s eyes, should be a number one priority. Schedule an appointment with your eye care professional today.

We here at the library understand the needs of our patrons in the different stages that we go through with our vision.  So many of you may be at the stage where you may need to choose something larger to read than regular print- we've got that for you- Large Print books.  And some of you may have trouble even reading this large print, but would still enjoy reading the books.  So for you we have books on cassette or on CD.  Whatever your need, we are here to help you get what you need.  If we don't have it here in our collection, we can borrow through Interlibrary Loan for you at no charge.  (We then have access to much more than our library's walls.) Depending on where the item is coming from,  this service may take 2 or 3 days, so you may need to plan accordingly if it's for a project or something.  

The library hours are as follows: 
Sunday  CLOSED    
Monday 11:00-5:00     
Tuesday 9:00-11:00  3:30-7:00   
Wednesday 11:00-5:00     
Thursday 3:30-7:00     
Friday 1:00-5:00     
Saturday 9:00-12:00 
 
 

Please let us know if we can help you find that book, audio, or movie that you need.  Remember that we do provide a Homebound Delivery Service.  A homebound person is someone at any age who is unable to visit the library due to a long or short-term illness, condition or disability.  This most certainly includes senior citizens who don't drive.   Just give us a call or email us what you are looking for and we will try to get that out to you later that same day.  When you are finished with the items, then give us a call back and we will then pick the items up from you.  It's like bringing the library to your home.  You can reach us at (641)482-3115 or by email at
tina-marie@melbourne.lib.ia.us or marcey-smith@melbourne.lib.ia.us
. Stay warm and until next time, Happy Reading!  

Celebrate Eye Care Month with the kids by creating these fun Eyeball Cupcakes:
First gather the ingredients for your eyeball cupcakes. You will need:
  • White icing
  • Vanilla or chocolate cupcakes
  • Green gel icing
  • One Junior Mint or black gumdrop
  • Red gel icing
Frost the cupcakes generously with white icing. Make sure you can't see any of the cupcake through the icing.  With the green gel icing, draw a circle in the center of the cupcake. Place a Junior Mint in the center of the circle. This is the eyeball.  Use the red gel icing to draw squiggly lines coming from the eyeball in the center of the cupcake.

Add a comment  (0 comments) posted by Tina Marie

Categories: FYILibrary HoursLibrary Info

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JANUARY 18, 2010
National Oatmeal Month

National Oatmeal Month
Known for the significant health benefits, oatmeal, for some, is a staple in the daily dietary program. Whether eaten for breakfast, lunch, dinner or as a snack, oatmeal provides a warming, soft, nutritious meal for children and adults alike. In January of each year, our country recognizes oatmeal for its nutritional value in what is known as National Oatmeal Month.


January is the month in which we buy more oatmeal than any other month of the year. In January 2001, we stocked our pantries with 34.6 million pounds of Quaker Oats; enough to make 346 million bowls of oatmeal. The most popular oatmeal topping is milk. Other popular toppings are: sugar, fruit (raisins, bananas) and butter/margarine. Among the most unusual are: eggnog, peanut butter, cottage cheese and brewer's yeast.

 
Eighty percent of U.S. households have oatmeal in their cupboard.
 
Oatmeal cookies are the No. 1 non-cereal usage for oatmeal, followed by meatloaf and cakes/pies.
 
An 18-ounce package of Old Fashioned Quaker Oats contains about 26,000 rolled oats.
 
Quaker Oats is enjoyed by families in over 24 countries. In Malaysia for example, it is knows as Chop Orange Tua, in some countries in South America, Quaker Oats is known as "the oats of the little old man."
 
The oat is called a groat after the hull has been removed.
 
Old Fashioned Oats are groats that are steamed and rolled but not cut. They cook in 5 minutes on the stove-top or 3 minutes in a microwave oven and can be used for baking.
 
Quick Oats are groats that are cut into two or three pieces, then steamed and rolled. They cook in just 1 minute on the stove-top or microwave oven and can also be used for baking. (Facts taken from Hungrymonster.com)

Oatmeal Clay
Make oatmeal clay for rainy day child play. Mix 1 cup oatmeal, 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 cup water. Children can mold and form the knobby clay into shapes. Use a blender to grind oatmeal into powder for smoother clay. Make colored clay by adding food coloring to the water. For another day of play, let the artworks dry. The hardened oatmeal clay can then be decorated with non-toxic paint. This oatmeal clay is fun but not edible.

Easy Oatmeal Muffins
Makes 12 muffins
Directions
1.      Preheat oven to 425°F. Grease 12 muffin cups or line with paper muffin liners.
2.     In a small bowl, combine milk and oats. Soak for 15 minutes.
3.     In a separate bowl, beat together egg and oil; stir in oatmeal mixture. In a third bowl, sift together flour, cinnamon, sugar, baking soda and salt. Stir flour mixture into wet ingredients, just until combined. Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups until cups are 2/3 full.
4.     Bake in preheated oven for 15-25 minutes or until a tooth pick inserted in center of muffin comes out clean.

Please enjoy these recipes with your family. As we are busy to get good nutritional food to the table for our families remember that children of all ages can help out depending on the task. Children love to be involved in helping to prepare meals or to craft. So next time you go to cook or bake something, oatmeal or not, involve the kids. They’ll love it! Until next time, Happy Reading!

Add a comment  (0 comments) posted by Tina Marie

Category: FYI

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JANUARY 16, 2010
Hot Tea Month

January is Hot Tea Month (from K-State Edu)

Truly Steeped in Tradition…
Yes, that perfect cup of tea is truly steeped in history and tradition. The Emperor of China was the first to enjoy the beverage created by steeping leaves from the herb Camelia Simensis plant nearly 5000 years ago. In colonial days, tea leaves were boiled at length to create a very bitter brew. This concoction of leaves that had been severely overcooked was then salted, buttered, and eaten.
 
Today tea is the world's second most popular beverage consumed, second only to water. It's easy to make, affordable, and offers variety in its flavors and aroma. Americans drink 50 billion cups of tea each year, 40 billion of which are served as iced tea.
 Tea Time Trivia…
·        The first tea bags were created by Thomas Sullivan in 1904, and made of
         silk.
·        The difference between Black, Green, and Oolong tea is a result of the
         changes that occur during processing of the tea leaves. They are all made 
         from the same type of tea leaves.
         o       Black teas are fermented, left in a cool, dark, and damp place for 
                  a time,  and then heated to stop the fermentation process.
        o       Oolong teas are semi-fermented.
        o       Green teas are heated after picking…so there is no fermenting process.
·        Herbal teas are not actually teas, but are concoctions of peels, flower
         leaves, herbs, and spices, and are caffeine free.
·        The caffeine content of tea is 40 mg in one cup of tea as compared to 99
         mg of caffeine in a cup of coffee.
·        Black and Green teas contain a certain type of antioxidant called
         flavenoids.
·        To be labeled “decaffeinated,” the caffeine content per cup of tea must be
         approximately 5 mg. 
 
Here at the library we have a group that gets together to share coffee or tea. The Weekly Readers Coffee Club meets every Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. They have coffee and tea together and share many yummy snacks. (I know first hand as I have sampled some of these goodies, which they have graciously shared with me.) Everyone is welcome to join this group. They may discuss books that they’ve read, share recipes, talk about the latest happenings, etc. Come join the group or bring a new friend to meet the others.  
Try this Capputeano
Now you can enjoy the mellow and milky taste of a cappuccino, but without the coffee. A bit of black tea, and some brown sugar make a nice alternative. Ingredients:
·                     2 cups milk
·                     2 tea bags, black
·                     3 tbs brown sugar
Preparation:
Heat milk and sugar together in a saucepan, almost to boiling. Remove from heat and add tea bags. Steep for 5 minutes. Remove tea bags and serve. Serves 2.

New Books at the library:
True Blue.                                  Baldacci, David
Breaking the Rules.                           Bradford, Barbara
Rainwater.                                    Brown, Sandra 
Nine Dragons.                                 Connelly, Michael
Once in a Blue Moon.                         Goudge, Eileen
U Is for Undertow.                            Grafton, Sue  
Dust to Dust.                                 Hoag, Tami    
Guilty As Sin.                                Hoag, Tami    
Ice.                                          Howard, Linda 
Fire and Ice.                                 Jance, Judith A
Trial by Fire.                                Jance, Judith A
Blood Game.                                   Johansen, Iris
A Stranger's Game.                            Johnston, Joan
Under the Dome.                               King, Stephen 
Silver Kiss.                                  Klause, Annette
Tempt Me at Twilight.                         Kleypas, Lisa  
30 Days of Night : Light of Day.              Mariotte, Jeff
Professional.                                 Parker, Robert
Spire: A Novel.                               Patterson, Rich
House of Reckoning: A Novel.                  Saul, John    
Change in Altitude: A Novel.                  Shreve, Anita 
Frostbite : A Werewolf Tale.                  Wellington, Dav

Until next time, Happy Reading!

Add a comment  (0 comments) posted by Tina Marie

Categories: Adult ProgramsFYISocial Event

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DECEMBER 21, 2009
Merry Christmas!!

Season’s Readings!

 We will be shut down here at the library from December 24th – January 3rd. We will reopen on Monday, January 4. We are sorry for the inconvenience that this may cause. We will extend all your due dates. 

  
Recipe for Christmas All Year Long
Take a heap of child-like wonder
That opens up our eyes
To the unexpected gifts in life—
Each day a sweet surprise.
Mix in fond appreciation
For the people whom we know;
Like festive Christmas candles,
Each one has a special glow.
Add some giggles and some laughter,
A dash of Christmas food,
(Amazing how a piece of pie
Improves our attitude!)
Stir it all with human kindness;
Wrap it up in love and peace,
Decorate with optimism, and
Our joy will never cease.
If we use this healthy recipe,
We know we will remember
To be in the Christmas spirit,
Even when it's not December.
By Joanna Fuchs


Spirt of Christmas
It's the feeling of home,
even if it's only a memory
that takes you there.
It's the quiet places
of the heart
you return to
year after year.
It's the comfort
of tradition
in an ever-widening
circle of friends
and family…

We’re wishing you everything beautiful this Christmas.

Add a comment  (0 comments) posted by Tina Marie

Categories: FYILibrary Info

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DECEMBER 7, 2009
December is...



The Best Gift you can Give is to be a Friend
December is Write to a Friend Month

(Article from epromos.com)This holiday season, reminisce about the past and catch up on old times during Write to a Friend Month. Throughout the years everyone loses touch with people they care about and the holidays usually bring those names to mind. Writing to friends is a good way to, not only tell them new things that are going on in your life, but also a way to find out what is going on in theirs. Everyone appreciates getting a letter and knowing that someone is thinking of them, so celebrate your friendships this December as well as all year long.

Spice up your letter writing by using greeting cards. Better yet write your note with different colored pens to show off your creative side. If you can't keep track of all your friends, use an address-book in order to find them more easily.

December is also Safe Toys and Gifts Month.   So to help you keep the Holidays Merry and Bright by giving safe toys and gifts to children this Year preventblindness.org suggests the following: 
  • Make recommendations to family members and friends about gifts that you feel are appropriate for your child.
  • Inspect all toys as much as possible before taking them out of the box.  Once opened, go through each part of the toy to make sure there are no small parts that could be choking hazards or sharp edges.
  • Avoid toys that shoot or include parts that fly off. BB guns and air guns should not even be considered toys.  Flying toys caused 9,600 injuries in 2008.
  • Gifts of sports equipment should always be accompanied by protective gear (such as a basketball along with eye goggles, a baseball with a batting helmet with a face shield).  In fact, 90 percent of all sports-related eye injuries can be prevented by using the appropriate eye protection.
  • Educate yourself on what products have been recalled.  Contact the CPSC at (800) 638-2772 or go to www.cpsc.gov.
  • Keep toys meant for older children away from younger ones.  Closely monitor all activities to make sure smaller children do not have access to toys that are not at their age-appropriate level.
  • Inspect toys for sturdiness. Your child’s toys should be durable, with no sharp edges or points. The toys should also withstand impact.  Dispose of plastic wrapping material immediately on toys as they may have sharp edges.
  • Never give toys with small parts to young children.  If a part of a toy can fit inside a toilet paper roll, the toy is considered a choking hazard and is not appropriate for children under the age of 3. 
Knitting and Crocheting- Tuesday, December 15 from 7-8 p.m. 
Teen Scene- Wednesday, December 16 from 7-8 p.m. “Christmas Party” 
Story Hour- Tuesday, December 15 from 11:30-12:30 p.m. “Christmas”
                  Tuesday, December 22 from 11:30-12:30 p.m. “Christmas Party”
Kids’ First- Tuesday, December 15 from 4:15-5:15 p.m. “Christmas”
                    Tuesday, December 22 from 4:15-5:15 p.m. “Christmas Party”
Weekly Readers Coffee Club- Tuesday, December 15 @ 3:30 p.m.
                                               Tuesday, December 22 @ 3:30 p.m.
 
For this and all other library happenings be sure to check out our website at www.melbourne.lib.ia.us   Library closings and cancellations are posted on our website or on the library door. The library will be shutdown from Thursday, December 24th – Sunday, January 3rd, 2010. We will reopen on Monday, January 4, 2010. We are sorry for the inconvenience this may cause. Please feel free to stock up before the shutdown. We will extend all due dates. Until next time, Happy Reading- and stay warm!

Add a comment  (0 comments) posted by Tina Marie

Categories: Adult ProgramsChildren's ProgramsLibrary Shutdowns

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NOVEMBER 30, 2009
NATIONAL STRESS-FREE FAMILY HOLIDAY

(from www.parentingwithoutpressure.com)
Great Expectations
    
The holiday season is a special time for enjoying our family and friends and celebrating traditions. However, it can also be a time for unrelenting stress. 
     
     A common mistake made by many is trying the recreate the perfect Norman Rockwell holiday. The house is beautifully decorated with outdoor lights and an exquisitely trimmed Christmas tree; numerous presents, all carefully chosen and meticulously wrapped are displayed under the tree; the holiday meal, fit for a king, includes all the old-time favorites; and everyone is in a festive mood. Picture perfect, maybe, but is it realistic? Is this scene applicable or even relevant to your family today? If you and your family create stress by trying to meet unrealistic expectations, make a firm commitment to do things differently this year.

      The trick is to identify those things that are important to your family and develop holiday traditions that are uniquely your own. A tradition is simply a family ritual that celebrates the family and sets it apart. A holiday tradition for your family might simply be the time and way you open Christmas or Hanukkah presents, or preparing Grandma Tate's sweet potato casserole, or attending religious services or community programs together. Hold a family meeting to discuss the traditions in your family. Pace yourself, and involve every family member in the holiday preparations. And don’t expect perfection! 

Simplify Please
1. If sending Christmas cards is a priority, make it a family project. Write a Christmas letter requiring contributions from every family member. Have the grown-ups address the envelopes and the kids put on the stamps. 
2. If you enjoy getting all the extended family together for a holiday meal, ask everyone to bring a dish. Also, consider purchasing all or part of your holiday meal from your favorite restaurant or cafeteria. Engage all family members in the clean-up duties.
3. If holiday treats are a priority, farm out the preparation. Fill pretty holiday tins
 with goodies from your favorite bakery.
4. Start early with holiday decorating. Consider putting the Christmas tree up right after Thanksgiving. You won’t be so rushed and can enjoy it longer. 
5. Make a gift list and utilize catalogs and the phone. Hire older kids to wrap your presents.   Consider gifts that don’t require shopping, such as magazine subscriptions or tickets to sporting events.   
6. Open some gifts on Christmas Eve to keep the children from becoming overwhelmed on Christmas morning. If possible, exchange gifts with extended family either before or after Christmas Day. 
7. Celebrate the true meaning of the season!

Priorities
With the current trend toward slick commercialism it is easy for children to be lured into GETTING rather than GIVING. You can help by taking time BEFORE the holiday to discuss realistic expectations about gifts. Save catalogs sent from local stores and have children cut out or circle the items they want. After specifying the number of gifts they may have, allow them to choose from their list. Help your children shift their focus outward by encouraging them to choose a gift to be donated to charity. Or make crafts or gift baskets to be delivered to a nursing home. Older children can volunteer to baby sit or help an elderly neighbor.

Stress Busters
…for Mom & Dad
  • Recognize the signs of stress. These include ineffective coping, such as becoming depressed, irritable, anxious or inability to concentrate. Stress related illnesses include headaches, high blood pressure, neck and back pain and stomach aches. Eliminate the threat of stress by putting yourself in control, rather than letting things just happen. 
  • Keep family expectations realistic. Don’t allow your family’s holiday expectations to be determined by extended family, friends, or the media. Instead, focus on your family’s strengths and be realistic about what works for your family as a whole. 
  • Give yourself permission to say, “No.” Be realistic about what you can and cannot accomplish. Say “I’m sorry, but this won’t work for me right now.”
  • Watch your diet. Eat lightly, more often, and include complex carbohydrates for energy. A diet high in carbohydrates increases the body’s supply of serotonin, a brain chemical known for its calming effect. Additionally, drink plenty of water and avoid overloading on the sweets, and snacks filled with empty calories.   Also, cut back on stimulants such as caffeine and nicotine.
  • Exercise. Exercise can rid the body of excess tension, help promote relaxation, improve cardiovascular function, and increase energy and stamina.
…for Children
  • Recognize the signs of stress. These include crankiness, irritability and a change in appetite or sleep habits. 
  • Provide structure. Kids thrive on routines, predictability. Therefore, structure is important for children especially during the holidays. Also, make sure kids get their sleep and take a nap or have a “quiet time” each day.
  • Set Clear Guidelines. Gently remind children of your expectations before going to grandma’s or the mall. Then, remember to praise, appreciate, encourage and acknowledge the good behavior. 
  • Give attention freely. Love is spelled TIME. Laugh, cuddle and play with your kids. Let them choose their favorite games, activities or book to share with you and have fun.
  • Encourage physical exercise. Exercise releases tension for children as well as burns excess energy! Plan daily for a minimum of 30 minutes of outside activities and play. 
  • Watch your children’s diet. Limit foods that may affect behavior, such as refined sweets, caffeine (found in chocolate and soft drinks), artificial preservatives and chemical coloring. Keep plenty of fresh fruit and raw veggies on hand for snacking.
 


 

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Category: FYI

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OCTOBER 19, 2009
Halloween is an Annual Holiday Celebrated on October 31

It originated in Ireland and has roots in the Celtic pagan festival of Samhain and the Christian holy day of All Saints. It is largely a secular celebration, but some have expressed strong feelings about perceived religious overtones. Irish immigrants carried versions of the tradition to North America during Ireland's Great Famine of the 1840s.

 
The day is often associated with orange and black, and is strongly associated with symbols like the jack-o'-lantern. Halloween activities include trick-or-treating, wearing costumes and attending costume parties, ghost tours, bonfires, visiting haunted attractions, pranks, reading scary stories, and watching horror films.

For young and old, Halloween is a real treat. We have many Halloween books and movies for children and adults here at the library. We have many of the scary movies that you’re looking for to create a fang-tastic night: Saw movies, the Boogey-man’s, The Haunting of Molly Hartley, The Happening, the Mirrors and many more horror movies to chill you to the bone. Borrow some free horror movies from the library, buy some soda pop and popcorn and invite some ghoul friends over to your place for a Gh’oul time. Eat, drink and be scary. You’re sure to have a Hallo-scream!

These treats are great to fix up for company and to hand out also. Just wrap each individual treat in plastic wrap. You can make these up to three days in advance.
Ingredients:
·                        8 cups popcorn
·                        1 cup candy corn
·                        1 bag of marshmallows
·                        1/4 cup butter - plus extra to grease hands
Preparation:
In a large mixing bowl pour in candy corn and popcorn. Melt the butter in a saucepan. Then melt marshmallows, stirring constantly. When the marshmallows are melted, pour over the popcorn and candy corn. Mix together with a large spoon. Be sure candy corn gets mixed in as it weights more than the popcorn and tends to go to the bottom of the bowl. When cool enough to handle, grease hands with butter and begin forming 2-inch balls. Makes 15 - 20 balls.

Remember your library has the resources that you need to help you to create a bootiful Halloween. We at the library hope you all have a Spooktakular good time in whatever it is that you do for Halloween. Until next time, I witch you a safe and Happy Halloween!!

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Category: FYI

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OCTOBER 19, 2009
October Library Happenings

 

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. You can check out there website for Patient Services covering areas: Being Newly Diagnosed,  Info For Survivors, How to Read a Pathology Report, How to Find Support, Free Information, Breast Cancer Q & A, even a Recipe Corner, Disease Info, and How You Can Help. Check out there website at http://www.nbcam.org/
 
DUE TO FLU CONCERNS:
Our concern is keeping the library a healthy environment. You can help by: STAYING HOME WHEN YOU ARE SICK, Covering your coughs and sneezes, Using antibacterial hand sanitizer; Throwing away your used tissues, Not using the library computers. People who appear sick may be asked to leave. Thank you for helping to keep the library a safe environment for all!!  

You can check out the latest news on the H1N1 on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/qa.htm or visit our website at www.melbourne.lib.ia.us and on our homepage click on the H1N1 picture. 

We had received a Grant from the Community Foundation in the amount of $500.00 to purchase new books to add to the Children and Young Adults’ collections in the library. We were able to purchase many popular fiction and even some great nonfiction books for these age groups. Here is a list of what we were able to add to the collection:

NEW CHILDREN’S FICTION BOOKS
Hi! Bye!                       Begin Smart Books
Little Quack Loves Colors        Lauren Thompson
Little Quack Counts                  Lauren Thompson
Look at Me!                             Begin Smart Books
Jesus Loves Me!                      Tim Warnes
Splish-Splash                            Danis, Naomi
Baby Plays Pat-Pat                   Begin Smart Books
I Want to Be Much More Bigger Like You.                  Child, Lauren
Where the Wild Things Are: The Movie Storybook     Sendak, Maurice
Scaredy Squirre                        Watt, Melanie
Library Lion.                            Knudsen, Michelle
Scaredy Squirrel Makes a Friend                      Watt, Melanie
Llama Llama Misses Mama.                             Dewdney, Anna
Would I Trade My Parents?                             Numeroff, Laura
Skippyjon Jones : Lost in Spice             Schachner, Judith Byron
Acorns Everywhere!.                                        Sherry, Kevin
Water HorseKing                                             Smith, Dick
Chester Raccoon and the Acorn Full of Memories   Penn, Audrey
Scaredy Squirrel at the Beach                           Watt, Melanie
Flabby Cat and Slobby Dog                             Willis, Jeanne
This Is Actually My Party                                  Child, Lauren
Finn Throws a Fit!                                            Elliott, David
Knuffle Bunny Too : A Case of Mistaken Identity         Willems, Mo
Boo to You!                                                     Ehlert, Lois

NONFICTION
How Loud Can You Burp
Monsters
Dewey: There’s a Cat in the Library!
What's Eating You? : Parasites -- the Inside Story.
Guinness World Records 2010.
One Cent, Two Cents, Old Cent, New Cent.
Come on, Dad! 75 Things for Fathers and Sons to do Together
Come on, Mom! 75 Things for Mothers and Daughters to Do Together
World Almanac and Book of Facts, 2009
Paula Deen's Cookbook for the Lunch-Box Set.
Best Gluten-free Family Cookbook

YOUNG ADULT FICTION:
There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom                 Louis Sachar
The Secret Zoo                                                Bryan Chick
One Wish                                                         Leigh Brescia
Watch the Skies (Daniel X series)                     James Patterson
The Eternal Kiss: 13 Vampire Tales of Blood & Desire Libba Bray/Rachel Caine
Darkside                                                          Tom Becker
The Low Road (Elf Realm series)                      Daniel Kirk
Nerds National Espionage, Rescue & Defense Society Michael Buckley
Stepping Up                                                     Mark Fink
Keeper of the Grail                                           Michael Spradlin
Holly Joliday.                                                    McDonald, Megan
The Key to Rondo                                            Emily Rodda
Tunnels                                                 Roderick Gordon
Rules of Three                                                  Megan McDonald
The Land of the Silver Apples Book 2 Nancy Farmer
Intertwined                                                       Gena Showalter
Between Us Baxters                                         Bethany Hegedus
Immortal                                                           Gillian Shields
Wish You Were Dead                                      Strasser, Todd

Thank you to Marshall County Community Foundation for making it possible to add new wonderful books into the library’s collection!! We hope that many of you will stop in to check out what we have available. Until next time, Happy Reading!

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Categories: Library InfoFYI

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OCTOBER 19, 2009
New Books @ your Library

An Unexpected Love     Tracie Peterson & Judith Miller
The Missing                       Beverly Lewis
Lonestar Secrets                Colleen Coble
Lonestar Sanctuary           Colleen Coble
The Believer                      Ann H. Cabhart
A Widow's Hope             Mary Ellis
Take Two (Above the Line Series) Karen Kingsbury
A Surrendered Heart             Tracie Peterson & Judith Miller
206 Bones                             Kathy Reichs
Dying for Mercy                 Mary Jane Clark
Storm Cycle                         Roy Johansen
Second Sight                         George D. Shuman
The Devil’s Punchbowl         Greg Iles
Fear the Worst                     Linwood Barclay
Justice Denied                       J.A. Jance
Any Minute                         Joyce Meyer & Deborah Bedford
Twelve Sharp                         Janet Evanovich
Still Life                                 Joy Fielding
The Last Song                     Nicholas Sparks
Blindman’s Bluff                 Faye Kellerman
The Knight                         Steven James
The Rook                           Steven James
Alex Cross’s Trial              James Patterson
Vanished                           Joseph Finder
 92 Pacific Boulevard     Debbie Macomber

Adult Nonfiction

A Big Little Life
Come on, Dad! 75 Things for Fathers and Sons to do together
Make Job Loss Work for You : Get over It and Get Your Career Back on Track.
Best Gluten-free Family Cookbook.
Come on, Mom! 75 Things for Mothers and Daughters to Do Together
World Almanac and Book of Facts, 2009.
Paula Deen's Cookbook for the Lunch-Box Set.

Library Hours:
Sunday  CLOSED    
Monday 11:00-5:00     
Tuesday 9:00-11:00 & 3:30-7:00   
Wednesday 11:00-5:00     
Thursday 3:30-7:00     
Friday 1:00-5:00     
Saturday 9:00-12:00  

Until next time, Happy Reading!

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Categories: FYILibrary Hours

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OCTOBER 19, 2009
October is National Popcorn Poppin’ Month

For more than 25 years, October has been celebrated as National Popcorn Poppin’ Month; however, it became "official" in 1999, when then Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman proclaimed October as National Popcorn Poppin’ Month.

While every day is a great day for celebrating popcorn, we chose the month of October because of the popcorn harvest which takes place each fall in the Midwest. Each year when the new crop is harvested, it reminds us popcorn will always be the naturally fun snack for the entire family. Popcorn Poppin' Month is the perfect time to celebrate popcorn.
Corny Facts

  • Americans consume some 16 billion quarts of this whole grain, good-for-you treat. That’s 54 quarts per man, woman, and child.
  • Compared to most snack foods, popcorn is low in calories. Air-popped popcorn has only 31 calories per cup. Oil-popped is only 55 per cup.
  • Most U.S. popcorn is grown in the Midwest, primarily in Indiana, Nebraska, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky and Missouri.
  • Many people believe the acres of corn they see in the Midwest during growing season could be picked and eaten for dinner, or dried and popped. In fact, those acres are typically field corn, which is used largely for livestock feed, and differs from both sweet corn and popcorn.
  • The peak period for popcorn sales for home consumption is in the fall.
  • Most popcorn comes in two basic shapes when it's popped: snowflake and mushroom. Snowflake is used in movie theaters and ballparks because it looks and pops bigger. Mushroom is used for candy confections because it doesn't crumble.
  • Popping popcorn is one of the number one uses for microwave ovens. Most microwave ovens have a “popcorn” control button.
  • “Popability” is popcorn lingo that refers to the percentage of kernels that pop.
  • There is no such thing as “hull-less” popcorn. All popcorn needs a hull in order to pop. Some varieties of popcorn have been bred so the hull shatters upon popping, making it appear to be hull-less.
  • How high popcorn kernels can pop? Up to 3 feet in the air.
  • On September 29, 2006 a new record was set for the World's Largest Popcorn Ball, as measured by the Guinness Book of World Records.  Eight feet in diameter and nearly 24.5 feet in circumference, this gargantuan confectionary creation weighed in at a whopping 3,423 pounds.  It took two days for employees of The Popcorn Factory to create the ball.
  • If you made a trail of popcorn from New York City to Los Angeles, you would need more than 352,028,160 popped kernels!

    Yet when all is said and done, popcorn is simply a great tasting food.  Surprise your family and friends with a popcorn treat today in honor of National Popcorn Poppin’ Month.  For tasty recipes, fun facts, popcorn trivia and more, visit
    www.popcorn.org.

    Popcorn Fixin’s
    Looking to spice up your popcorn? Here are a few topping favorites:

    • Garlic salt
    • Parmesan cheese
    • Thyme
    • Cumin
    • Oregano
    • Dry taco seasoning mix
    • Dry ranch-style seasoning mix
    • Lemon pepper
    • Italian herbs: oregano, basil, marjoram, thyme, and crushed rosemary.
    • French herbs: marjoram, thyme, summer savory, basil, rosemary, sage, and fennel
    • Cinnamon, brown sugar, nutmeg

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Category: FYI

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OCTOBER 19, 2009
Melbourne Library Accredited

The State Library of Iowa has announced that the Melbourne Public Library has met the conditions for state accreditation as outlines in "In Service to Iowa: Public Library Measures of Quality, 4th ed."


Achieving accreditation requires a significant, ongoing local commitment to high quality library services.  Of Iowa's 543 public libraries, 338- including the Melbourne Public Library- are accredited.  The Melbourne Library has been recognized for its efforts in all areas of library administration including governance and funding; staffing; library collection; services; public relations; and access and facilities.  The accreditation is valid through June 30, 2012.
 
Iowa's accredited public libraries are recognized for being responsive to their communities and for exhibiting excellence in their provision of library services.  Libraries are cornerstones of our communities.  They reflect and help strengthen the economic health of communities, as well as the people who use them. 
 
Accredited libraries receive a higher rate of compensation through the State Library of Iowa's Enrich Iowa/Direct State Aid program.  They also receive an official Certificate of Accreditation signed by the Governor Chet Culver State Librarian Mary Wegner, and Iowa Commission of Libraries Chairwoman Monica Gohlinghorst.
 
Said Wegner, "The director and the board of trustees of the Melbourne Public Library and the city of Melbourne are to be commended for this achievement and their commitment to excellence in public library services for their community. 

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Category: FYI

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OCTOBER 19, 2009
Libary Happenings in August


We have finished our "Kid's First"(Afterschool program) room in the library.  This was a special project that I have been working on funded by the Martha Ellen Tye Foundation grant that we had received.  I was able to update/remodel our storage room in the library basement to turn into a livable and enjoyable space.  I was able to paint and refinish the cement portion of the floor, I put up curtains to cover the shelves that we use for storage in the basement.  Gary Fricke cut the carpet and tacked it down for us, and my wonderful sister, Lisa painted the beautiful murals on the walls.  Thank you both for your help with this much needed project!     


We will start the afterschool program on Tuesdays, starting September 22.  We will meet from 4:15 - 5:15 p.m.  This is for Kindergartners on up.  We have a snack, stories, games, crafts, and many other activities.  We meet every Tuesday unless there is no school.  We hope that your children will be joining us as we will be putting your "Kids' First." 

Story Hour will also be  held on Tuesdays, starting September 22.  This is for 3, 4, and 5 year olds.  They will meet from 11:30 - 12:30.  We begin the program with book reading, followed by songs, games, crafts, fingerplays, puppets, a snack or other activities.  The children will enjoy all the activities and of course be able to check out books and movies- keeping the 3-day movies for a whole week!- as a bonus for being in Story Hour.  We have a Halloween and Christmas Party and a picnic in May.  Lots of fun for your little one- let your child be the judge!       

Teen Scene is a program for 5th graders on up. We meet for activities, games, crafts, food and fun.   We meet the 3rd Wednesday of the month during the school year.  So we will start on the 16th of September from 7-8 p.m.  We will be celebrating "Back to School" with various activities.   Hope you will join us. 

Calling all knitters & crocheters... Have we got a great way for you to meet others and to learn new ideas and patterns. We will be offering a class for those who want to learn knitting and crocheting. We also offer a wonderful opportunity for those who already knit/crochet to come together to share ideas and conversation with others in our group.  If you would like to learn to knit or crochet have we got the right people for the job.  We have 2 of the most caring & patient teachers, that are so dedicated to helping you learn.  They are Kathy Kelly and Lois Wermager.  Come join them starting Tuesday, September 15 from 7- 8 p.m.  They will meet then after the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of the month. 

Our Friends group was able to purchase for us a wonderful addition to the library collection from Nest Family.  It is a complete learning system.  For over 15 years, NEST Family has provided the best in inspirational, educational and entertaining videos, audios, books and other items for families, home educators, schools churches and libraries.  As their name suggests, NEST provides an environment that fosters development and nurtures the young. Their engaging stories and music provide inspirational, entertaining, and educational tools that help loved ones share with each other their values, morals and wisdom. 

We have the Animated Hero Classic Series, and with this children will learn to appreciate democratic principles, values, and people from many cultures who contributed to economic and political heritage in world history. Plus, The Animated Hero Classic Series promotes the development of higher level thinking skills such as analyzing, evaluating, sequencing, and more!   We will be using this throughout the school year for the afterschool kids and this is open for anyone to use and check out especially home schoolers.  We do allow the DVD videos to be checked out for a whole week and the educational workbooks are for "In Library Use Only"  but we do offer you the opportunity to copy the necessary pages for $.10 a copy.  Some of the heroes are Joan of Arc, Benjamin Franklin, Harriet Tubman, Helen Keller, The Wright Brothers, and many more.  We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful new addition to our collection. 

The library will be closed on Monday, September 7 for Labor Day.  We will resume normal business hours on Tuesday, Sept. 8.  We wish you a very happy and safe Labor Day weekend. 
Until next time, Happy Reading!

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Categories: Adult ProgramsChildren's ProgramsFYI

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JANUARY 26, 2009
Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day is a holiday celebrated in United States and Canada on February 2.  The legend of Groundhog Day is based on an old Scottish couplet: "If Candlemas Day is bright and clear, there'll be two winters in the year."  Every February 2, people gather at Gobbler's Knob, a wooded knoll just outside of Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania.  Residents contend that the groundhog has never been wrong.

The ceremony in Punxsutawney was held in secret until 1966, and only Phil's prediction was revealed to the public. Since then, Phil's fearless forecast has been a national media event.  The groundhog comes out of his electrically heated burrow, looks for his shadow and utters his prediction to a Groundhog Club representative in "groundhogese." The representative then translates the prediction for the general public.

If Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow, it means six more weeks of winter. If he does not see his shadow, it means spring is just around the corner.  Approximately 90% o the time, Phil sees his shadow.  Phil started making predictions in 1887 and has become an American institution.

The children's programs here at the library (Story Hour and Kids' First Afterschool Program) that week will be learning and having fun with Groundhog Day. They will be hearing stories on Groundhog Day, participating in activities and creating crafts that have to do with this theme.
Here's a little Groundhog poem: 
Here's a little groundhog furry and brown
He's coming up to look around
If he see's his shadow, down he'll go
Then six more weeks of winter, OH NO!

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Categories: Children's ProgramsFYILibrary Info

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JANUARY 26, 2009
Chinese New Year or Spring Festival

Chinese New Year or Spring Festival is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays.  This year it begins on Monday, January 26th.  Chinese New Year is a holiday that celebrates the beginning of a new year according to the lunar calendar.  It is considered to be one of the most important holidays for Chinese families.  The holiday is celebrated with big family gatherings, gift giving, the eating of symbolic foods and display of festive decorations--all focused on bringing good luck for the new year and celebrating the coming of Spring.  The children's programs here at the library (Story Hour and Kids' First Afterschool Program) this week have the the Chinese New Year theme.  They will be hearing stories on the Chinese New Year, participating in activities and creating crafts that have to do with this theme also. 
 

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Categories: Children's ProgramsFYILibrary Info

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JANUARY 26, 2009
Adult Programs Going Again @ Library

Calling all knitters & crocheters...
Have we got a great way for you to meet others and to learn new ideas and patterns.  If you are currently a knitter/crocheter you are welcome to meet with a group that gets together every other Tuesday. They started back up on January 6th and they will have met again this month on January 20th. Next month, they will meet Tuesday, February 3rd and the 17th from 7-8 p.m.   If you would like to learn to knit or crochet have we got the right people for the job.  We have 2 of the most caring & patient teachers, whom are so dedicated to helping you learn. So we offer a class for those who want to learn knitting and crocheting and we also offer a wonderful opportunity for those who already knit/crochet to come together to share ideas and conversation with others in our group.

The library offers scrapbookers a place to come together to share their ideas and their hobby. We have a scrapbooking group that shares their ideas and our wonderful teacher, Mary Pothast, is there to help you get started or to help spark an idea. She also brings various paper, stamps, scissors, punches, etc. for you to use. You may purchase and complete a page for $1.00. Come to create your albums or pages and hang out with others who enjoy doing the same thing you do- capturing those special moments and finding just the right way to accentuate them. They meet every other Tuesday also. Same dates as the Knitters/Crocheters but they meet from 7-9 p.m. So they will meet Tuesday, February 3rd and the 17th. Ages 10 and up are welcome to join these groups. 

Be sure to check out our website often for other Library Happenings. 
www.melbourne.lib.ia.us  We also have a news blog that you may subscribe to on our website and post comments. This is located on our homepage. We have one for the Young Adults also. Theirs is found on the Teen Tab, just click on the Teen Scene Blog. We try to keep these updated so you know what’s going on here at the library and other things for “your information.”  Until next time, Happy Reading! 

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Categories: Adult ProgramsFYILibrary Info

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JANUARY 26, 2009
New Children and Young Adult Books

New Children and Young Adult Books:
The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling
Operating Codes by Nick Manns
Yubisaki: Milk Tea
Celestial Legend: Yuhi
Real Life, Here I Come
Chocolate for a Teen’s Dreams
Where do Babies Come From?
Toestomper and the Caterpillars by Sharleen Collicott
Lucia and the Light by Phillis Root

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Categories: FYILibrary Info

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JANUARY 26, 2009
New Library Books

New Adult Books at the library:
Texas! Lucky by Sandra Brown
Texas! Lucky (Large Print) by Sandra Brown

Running Hot by Jayne Ann Krentz
Fire and Ice by Julie Garwood
Santa Cruise by Mary and Carol Higgins Clark
Time to Embrace by Karen Kingsbury
This is How it Happened by Jo Barrett
Plum Spooky by Janet Evanovich
A Ghostly Good Time
The Playskool Guide to Potty Training

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DECEMBER 22, 2008
"Lead Poisoning: How to Protect Iowa Families”


“Lead Poisoning: How to Protect Iowa Families”
is a program that will be held at the library on February 5 at 7:00 p.m. Jackie Pippen, Coordinator of East Central Iowa Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention serving Marshall, Hardin, Tama and Benton counties, will be presenting the program. You will learn about the federal law on lead based paint, lead-based paint and the hazards, how to check your home for these paint hazards, and much more. What a perfect way to educate yourself so that you can protect yourself and your loved ones.  Please stop in the library, give us a call (641)482-3115, or email us at karen-antle@melbourne.lib.ia.us by Monday, January 26th.   * As always, our classes and programs are FREE!!!! Please take advantage of these wonderful opportunities for you and your family. 

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Categories: FYILibrary InfoAdult Programs

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DECEMBER 22, 2008
Baby on the Way for Tina Marie and Gary!


My husband and I are expecting a new baby in February of 2009. I will be having a maternity leave as soon as baby comes so there will not be any children and teen programs at the library during my leave. (As I am the one who works with this age group.) I will try to keep you aware of when the programs will stop and then again when they will start back up. Please watch for advertising and you can always check our website www.melbourne.lib.ia.us I will be leaving you in good hands- Karen and Rita will help you the best they can with your library needs while I am away.   These girls are great and are ready to assist you. Please don’t hesitate to let them know what you need.

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Categories: FYILibrary InfoChildren's Programs

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