SAXTON B. LITTLE FREE LIBRARY
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Saxton Reads! & Reviews

We invite the public to post reviews to our catalog by logging into our online catalog. Reviews will then be posted to this blog. Comments can be added to existing posts or may be added as separate reviews on our catalog
DECEMBER 14, 2011
The Bounty ~ Caroline Alexander
****comments by CarolK

The Bounty ~ Caroline Alexander
My husband and I decided to listen to Caroline Alexander’s The Bounty after listening to Bligh’s daily log account of the infamous Mutiny on The H.M.S. Bounty. We were hoping to clear up some questions we had regarding Bligh and his character. If you’ve ever watched any of the movies that depict the mutiny, you can’t help but come away with a bad taste in your mouth for Bligh. He is portrayed as the villain and Fletcher Christian appears to be justified in his rebellion.
 
Alexander’s book goes into great detail about the mutiny, and the court-martial of the ten mutineers who were captured in Tahiti and brought to justice in England. Bligh, in our opinion is vindicated and seems to be the victim of Hollywood and most importantly, Fletcher Christian. We both came away feeling that Bligh had his faults, that he was a disciplinarian and cut no slack to his crew. This seems just in his role as the man who is responsible for the survival of all.
 
William Bligh and the mutiny took place in the 1700’s so none of us were there to see it with our own eyes. We can only base our opinions on what has been recorded, researched and written about by authors and scholars. We both ended up wishing we could hear Christian’s version of the events. We are certain he would have to paint a picture to discredit Bligh but at least, we would hear it from the horse’s mouth.
 
Bligh continues in his career and is appointed Rear Admiral in July, 1811. Not bad for a man who was scorned by many.
 
There is much speculation on both men’s lives and their fateful encounter. If you have any interest in the subject, Alexander’s book is a good bet.


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