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APRIL 3, 2013
New Blog Site!

Starting today, April 3rd, we'll be blogging from the new jeffcolibrary.org. You can keep following this blog here:
 
http://jeffcolibrary.org/teen
 

We hope to see you there. Thanks for reading!

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posted by Erin, Golden Library

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APRIL 2, 2013
Read This! Au Revoir Crazy European Chick by Joe Schreiber

Gobi takes Perry on the weirdest, most dangerous, and most exhilarating night of his life when she transforms from an introverted, anti-social Lithuanian exchange student into a trained assassin.

Au Revoir Crazy European Chick is an excellent choice if you enjoyed the Alex Rider or Gallagher Girls series. There's also a sequel, Perry's Killer Playlist.
 

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posted by Chandra, Belmar Library

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APRIL 1, 2013
Movie Monday - Catching Fire

I'm so excited the new Catching Fire movie trailer has been released:

 

April fools! Catch the much better version on which this one is based on YouTube.  This video was brought to you with the help of a glue gun, burnt fingers, my husband who is much more tech savy than me and my 5 year old son who helped me film the fight scenes.

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posted by Arra, Lakewood Library

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MARCH 30, 2013
Science Saturday -- Eggsperiments

(Super cheesy, I know. I couldn't resist)

Here are a few eggy experiments to help you celebrate Easter weekend:

Suck an egg into a bottle (from The Naked Scientists): You'll need a hard boiled egg, a bottle with a slightly smaller neck, a little oil and a match (or you can try it with boiling water). You'll light the match and put it in the bottle, with will warm the air inside and cause it to expand. As the air cools, the egg will be sucked into the bottle. Read through the link for full directions, as well as instructions for getting your egg back out again.

Egg Geodes (from The Happy Scientist): You'll need clean egg shells and an egg carton to hold them, epsom salt, food coloring, and hot water. You'll finish with cool crystalized eggs. Read through the link for the directions.

Naked Egg or Rubber Egg (from Steve Spangler Science): You'll need an egg, a glass, and a lot of vinegar. Basically, you let the egg sit in the vinegar until the acetic acid in the vinegar reacts with the calcium carbonate in the egg shell and breaks it down. I saw a few other websites that said you could bounce it against your table, but do so at your own risk! Read through the link for full directions.

What other experiments can you think of?

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posted by Jessie, Columbine Library

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MARCH 29, 2013
New Jefferson County Public Library Website

Preview TodayDid you know that the Jefferson County Public Library is getting a new website? It will go live next week, but if you're curious (like I always am!) you can preview it today. A few things to note:

-Check out the new teen page to access teen-specific homework help, events, book reviews, and our updated Crazy Readerz blog.

-You can search the library catalog from every page of the website. Just use the search box in the top right corner. There are two tabs--one to search the catalog and one to search the website.

-There is an "Ask Us" link at the top and bottom of every page. Use this to connect with a librarian through email, chat or phone.

-Did you know the library checks out ebooks, downloadable audiobooks, and electronic magazines? Try the new "Downloads" page for more info.

-And finally, tell us what you think!

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posted by Jessie, Columbine Library

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MARCH 28, 2013
Book Safes!

Need something to do over Spring Break? Come to the Golden Library tomorrow at 2:30 and make your own book safe. Create a hidden compartment in a book and baffle your nosy little brother looking for your private stuff. He'll never check a book!

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posted by Erin, Golden Library

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MARCH 27, 2013
The Weirdness All Around

The world is a big, awesome, crazy place full of amazing weirdness!  If you keep your eyes open for it, you can spot it all around.  Some of my favorite weirdness comes in the guise of… SCIENCE!

Here are a couple of my favorite ‘science’ books that put a new spin on things.  They might make you reconsider how you view the universe.

The Dancing Wu Li Masters : An Overview of the New Physics by Gary Zukav: This book introduced me to particle physics but not in a boring, academic way.  The voice is conversational, the science is real, and the possibilities that exist in and around us are mind blowing!  You will never look at the world the same way again.
 

 

The Hidden Messages in Water by Masaru Emoto: Water holds memory and, according to the studies of Dr. Masaru Emoto, intention as well.  Dr. Emoto exposed water to words and then froze the water into snowflakes which he would film.  He noticed that positive words like ‘love,’ and ‘truth,’ would cause the water to transform into beautiful, perfect snowflakes.  Negative words like, ‘hate’ or ‘pollution’ caused the water to transform into distorted, ugly snowflakes.  This happened whether you spoke to the water or just put a sign close by the water with the word written on it.  Crazy!  But sooooo neat!

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posted by Tana, Arvada Library

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MARCH 26, 2013
Read This! The Dead and Buried by Kim Harrington

Some of you may already know how much I loved the Clarity books by Kim Harrington. When I realized she had a new book out I was a little worried; what if I didn’t like it? Never fear! It was amazing!

The Dead and Buried is a ghost story. A very spooky ghost story. Jade’s family moves into a new house they never should have been able to afford. When she starts poking around she realizes that the reason the house was so cheap is because the most popular girl in school, who also happened to be the meanest of mean girls, was murdered in the house last spring. And then Jade realizes that her little brother can see the ghost. And that the ghost can move her stuff around and destroy things. And it can possess people and make them do whatever it wants. Now the ghost needs Jade to solve the murder before it can move on, but it’s not very patient and it’s not very nice about it. Can Jade solve the murder before the ghost destroys her family?

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posted by Jessie, Columbine Library

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MARCH 26, 2013
Movie Time at Standley Lake

 

 Tweens & Teen Movie Time

Standley Lake Library

Friday, March 29th

1:00 – 2:45 pm

It’s spring break! Come to the library for a new DVD release.

Here’s your hints for the movie showing:

1. Animated comedy

2. The star has massive hands

3. He wants to be a hero.

Call 303-235-5275 if you’d like more information.

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posted by Pam, Standley Lake Library

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MARCH 25, 2013
Movie Monday – The Book Thief

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak has a release date of January 17th, 2014. Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson have been cast and Brian Percival is the director. When the official trailer comes out we will share it. For now enjoy both of the following homemade movie trailers. 

 

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posted by Pam, Standley Lake Library

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MARCH 24, 2013
Little Free Libraries

Free LibraryHave you seen a Little Free Library? American Profile (which comes in the Denver Post) recently did a great article about them. Little free libraries are popping up all over the country. People build and decorate little boxes and then stock them with books. You can take a book, return it whenever you want, or replace it with a different book. And they're all different designs, too. Check the article for more pictures, or do a Google image search. I saw one in Denver the other day I was so excited that I had to take this picture!

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posted by Jessie, Columbine Library

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MARCH 23, 2013
Science Saturday - Feynman Biography

Richard Feynman is a rare person who had both a sense of humor and also was an amazing scientist.  He was instrumental in such events as inventing the atom bomb and also discovering the cause of the Challenger spaceship explosion.  Feynman was a key scientist in the study of quantum physics, which explains the behavior of miniscule particles.  While at Cornell University Feynman worked on an explanation for how particles interact with each other.  He calculated all the possible ways a particle could move between two points, this is the path integral.  He then created a graph that would calculate a particles path integral in both space and time showing how the particle moves.  This graphic is appropriately called a Feynman Diagram.

Some interesting personal information about Feynman:  He was rejected from the World War II draft for mental reasons.  Apparently, he was too literal in the interview.  He performed in the student production of South Pacific at Caltech. He was an expert safe cracker.

Want to know more?  Check out the graphic novel biography of Richard Feynman or go online to our Science in Context database.

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posted by Arra, Lakewood Library

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MARCH 22, 2013
Sherlock Reads

Sherlock Holmes sure is making a comeback these days. In addition to the different TV shows and movies that are out right now, there are also a few good teen books that you might want to try:

Secret LettersSecret Letters by Leah Scheier: Dora travels to London to meet Sherlock Holmes, who might be her biological father, and ask for his help in a blackmail case. Along the way she gets some help from a handsome young detective.
 

Death CloudDeath Cloud by Andrew Lane: This is the first in the Young Sherlock Holmes series and tells the story of a fourteen-year-old Sherlock on his first murder investigation. If you like this one there are three more in the series.
 

Eye of the CrowEye of the Crow by Shane Peacock: This is the first book in the Boy Sherlock Holmes series (not to be confused with the Young Sherlock Holmes series mentioned above). In this one, thirteen-year-old Sherlock ends up a murder suspect and must solve the crime to clear his name.

No Place Like Holmes by Jason Lethcoe: An aspiring detective gets a big break when he goes to England to visit his uncle who lives next door to Sherlock Holmes.

 

And don't forget, there's always the original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as well. Have you read any of them?

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posted by Jessie, Columbine Library

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MARCH 21, 2013
Book Covers I Love

Here are a few book covers I love:

"Broken Lands"

What are some of your favorites?

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posted by Arra, Lakewood Library

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MARCH 20, 2013
The Selection by Kiera Cass

Have you read The Selection yet? I think it reads like a cross between a reality TV dating show and the royal wedding. When the prince needs to find a wife, 35 young women are selected to live with him in the palace. They are sent home as he weeds them out until only one woman remains--the one who will become Queen. All this is broadcast on TV and the families of the women are rewarded depending on how far the girls make it in the competition.

The Selection was optioned for a TV show right when it came out, and now the CW has approved a script for the pilot. I'm excited to see how this turns out because it was such a fun book! Here's a trailer for the book, which may give you some ideas for what the show could look like:

While we wait for the show, get yourself on the hold list for the sequel, The Elite, which comes out April 23.

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posted by Jessie, Columbine Library

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MARCH 18, 2013
Movie Monday - Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Have you read the book Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson?  I couldn't put it down when I read it.  Something happened at a party at the beginning of the school year and now Melinda has stopped talking.  She drifts through school trying to avoid any contact with other people.  Dave, the art teacher, finally starts to break through Melinda's silence.  The movie stays close to the plot of the book and is one of Kristen Stewart's first movie appearances.  Check it out today from the library.

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posted by Arra, Lakewood Library

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MARCH 17, 2013
Breaking Down Barriers

Are you interested in leadership, advocacy or teen health issues? Do you want to improve your communication skills? Check out the 2013 Colorado Youth Summit on Saturday, April 20th from 8am - 4pm at North High School in Denver.

Highlights of this year's summit include:

  • Workshops on communication, advocacy and leadership skills
  • Games, team building and a community art project
  • Free breakfast, lunch and snacks for the first 100 participants for RSVP

Contests and Prizes!

  • Create the official Youth Summit logo and win a $100 cash prize
  • Participate in a poster competition with prizes up to $300 and a chance to win a professional promo video
  • Ready! Set! ACTion! award presentation (www.readysetaction.org)

RSVP today at Coyouthsummit@gmail.com with your name and your contact phone number.

 

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posted by Pam, Standley Lake Library

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MARCH 16, 2013
Science Saturday - Sharks!


"Great white shark, or white shark (Carcharodon carcharias)." Gale Science in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Science In Context. Web. 16 Mar. 2013.

Sharks date back to the time of the dinosaurs.  They have a reputation as being the great killers of the ocean but this is not necessarily true.  The largest shark is the Whale Shark which can be as long as 59 feet.  This shark is extremely gentle and feeds on zooplankton.   The smallest shark species is the Dwarf Lanternshark which can fit into a man's palm.  According to the Science in Context Database: " in the year 2012 there were eighty confirmed unprovoked shark attacks on humans world-wide. This included fifty-three attacks in U.S. waters, mostly occurring off beaches in Florida."

All sharks are cartilaginous.  This means their skeletons are made completely of cartilage.  Unlike fish, sharks don’t have scales, but rather spiny projections known as denticles. Sharks also have a third eye, called a pineal eye, which is used to sense light. 

Fish have air bladders that allow them to float in the water but sharks do not.  Most sharks must be in constant motion to stay afloat.  One thing that does help them stay afloat is their fatty liver.

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posted by Arra, Lakewood Library

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MARCH 15, 2013
Opposing Viewpoints in Context

-School debate coming up?
-Argumentative research paper?
-Argumentative friend?

Opposing Viewpoints in Context is a great resource for all these things and more! They take current events and ethically controversial topics and give you all the information you would need to make an informed argument. For example, I looked up school uniforms. First I get an article outlining all the background info I need, such as the difference between dress codes and uniforms, court cases, the cost of uniforms, and issues with sweat shops. I can also read arguments for and against school uniforms, such as “School Uniforms Stifle Freedom of Expression” or “School Dress Codes are Necessary and Constitutional,” which lay out the pros and cons of the issue and include great examples. Then I can read through magazine and newspapers articles about the topic, listen to audio files, watch videos, get statistics, and link to other websites. And all of this information is in one place and easy to use!

You can access Opposing Viewpoints in Context by going to jeffcolibrary.org and then clicking on “Research Tools” and then “Subscription Databases A-Z.” You don’t have to be in the library to use it—just log in with your name and library card number. Search for what you’re interested in, or click on “Browse Issues” to get ideas. Winning an argument is always fun; now you can be prepared!

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posted by Jessie, Columbine Library

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MARCH 13, 2013
Are Your Spidey Senses Tingling, Yet?

Two Words: STAN LEE

Yes. That’s right fearless fans, Stan Lee with be at Denver Comic Con May 31st – June 2, 2013. If you didn’t get a chance to go to the inaugural DCC last year, definitely make an effort to go this year.

There are great booths to visit, artists to chat with, and panels to sit in on to learn all the ins and outs of your favorite graphic novels and comics. And of course you don’t want to miss the cosplay, cuz it’s so much fun! (Remember! If your costume has a ‘gun’ – you need to have an orange tip attached…just sayin’.)

Other featured guests for the three day event include: George Takei, Greg Guler, Felicia Day, George Perez, Wil Wheaton, Jeffrey Brown… Tickets for Teens range from $12 for a one day Friday pass to $30 for a three day pass.

The Stan Lee Silver and Gold Add On packages will be available soon at a mysterious price to be determined later. So get your tickets now, and then check the website compulsively until they post the Stan Lee info.

If you go, and you’re in costume, make sure you post a pix on our Facebook page! Hope to see ya!

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posted by Tana, Arvada Library

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MARCH 12, 2013
Egg Decorating

 

Egg Decorating

Standley Lake Library

Tweens and Teens

Saturday, March 16th

2:00 – 3:30 pm

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posted by Pam, Standley Lake Library

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